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Choose one (1) question and write an essay of 3500 words Your answer should make

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Choose one (1) question and write an essay of 3500 words Your answer should make detailed reference to the novel (i.e. you must give thematic and narrative examples and provide their critical analysis ) Each answer must use at least at least five (5) relevant secondary sources (Study Guides, lectures and tutorials/discussions do not count as secondary sources. Please use some of the materials in the relevant Further Reading sections, they are sufficient secondary sources, so please use those before searching additional sources ). You are required to comply with the word limit. This encourages you to be succinct, precise and clear, and they also provide a good indicator of the depth to which you are expected to go. The word count includes the main text, including all in-text references and quotations (short and long/block), but not the cover page and the list of works cited. The word count is taken from the first word of the introduction to the last word of the conclusion. 10% word limit margin applies for each answer (10% margin: min. 3150 – 3850 max). Your answers should follow the requirements of academic writing including the formal tone and referencing conventions of MLA style. Place the relevant list of Works Cited on a separate page at the end of your essay. All assignments must use double line spacing for the body of the text, unless single spacing is appropriate for particular sections (including works cited). Edit your work carefully including for punctuation, spelling, sentence and paragraph construction, and referencing. Please familiarise yourself with the marking criteria below. Use of unacknowledged or inappropriate sources will be penalised as per the marking criteria below. H. G. Wells – The Time Machine The vitality of H. G. Wells’s The Time Machine comes from its many self-contradictions. Examine the ways in which the novel uses the theme of time travel to engage with diverse scientific, social and cultural ideas. Your answer should make detailed reference to the novel (i.e. you must give thematic and narrative examples and provide their critical analysis) and use at least five (5) relevant secondary sources. OR Ursula Le Guin – The Left Hand of Darkness What are the most important examples and insights Ursula Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness has to offer about the encounter with the alien Other? Your answer should make detailed reference to the novel (i.e. you must give thematic and narrative examples and provide their critical analysis) and use at least five (5) relevant secondary sources. RELEVANT REFERENCES: The Time Machine: Bergonzi, Bernard. “The Publication of The Time Machine 1894-5.” The Review of English Studies, vol. 11, no. 41, 1960, pp. 42–51. Cantor, Paul, and Peter Hufnagel. “The Empire of the Future. Imperialism and Modernism in H. G. Wells.” Studies in the Novel, vol. 38, no. 1, 2006, pp. 36–56. Manlove, Colin. “Charles Kingsley, H. G. Wells, and the Machine in Victorian Fiction.” Nineteenth-Century Literature, vol. 48, no. 2, 1993, pp. 212–39. Page, Michael R. “‘Dim Outlines on a Desolate Beach’ H. G. Wells”. The Literary Imagination from Erasmus Darwin to H.G. Wells Science, Evolution, and Ecology. Taylor and Francis, 2016, pp.149-191. Pearson, Richard. “Primitive Modernity. H. G. Wells and the Prehistoric Man of the 1890s.” Yearbook of English Studies, vol. 37, no. 1, 2007, pp. 58–74. Philmus, Robert M. “The Time Machine. Or, The Fourth Dimension as Prophecy.” PMLA, vol. 84, no. 3, 1969, pp. 530–535. Shackleton, David. “H. G. Wells, Geology, and the Ruins of Time.” Victorian Literature and Culture, vol. 45, no. 4, 2017, pp. 839–855. Tuerk, Richard. “Upper-Middle-Class Madness. H. G. Wells’ Time Traveller Journeys to Wonderland.” Extrapolation, vol. 46, no. 4, 2005, pp. 517-526. Left Hand of Darkness: Attebery, Brian. “Androgyny and Difference.” Decoding Gender in Science Fiction. Routledge, 2002, pp. 129-150. Bassnett, Susan. “Remaking the Old Worlld. Ursula Le Guin and the American Tradition.” Where No Man Has Gone Before. Women and Science Fiction. Edited by Lucie Armitt, Rutledge, 1991, pp. 50-66. Burns, Tony. “Marxism and Science Fiction. A Celebration of the Work of Ursula K. Le Guin.” Capital & Class, no. 84, 2004, pp. 139-148. Fayad, Mona. “Aliens, Androgynes, and Anthropology. Le Guin’s Critique of Representation in The Left Hand of Darkness.” Mosaic. A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, vol. 30, no. 3, 1997, pp. 59–73. Haraway, Donna. “The Promises of Monsters. A Regenerative Politics for Inappropriate/d Othres.” Cultural Studies, edited by Lawrence Grossberg et al., Routledge, 1992. pp. 295-337. Hollinger, Veronica. “(Re)reading Queerly. Science Fiction, Feminism, and the Defamiliarization of Gender.” Future Females, the Next Generation. Edited by Marleen S. Barr, Rowman & Lttlefield, 2000, pp.197-215. Hollinger, Veronica. “Feminist Theory and Science Fiction.” The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction, Cambridge UP, 2003, pp. 125–136. Lefanu, Sarah. “Inner Space and Outer Lands. Ursula K. Le Guin.” In the Chinks of the World Machine. Feminism & Science Fiction. The Women’s Press, 1988, pp. 130-146. Leonards, Elisabeth Anne. “Race and Ethnicity in Science Fiction.” The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction, Cambridge UP, 2003, pp. 253-263. Lothian, Alex. “Feminist and Queer Science Fiction in America.” The Cambridge Companion to American Science Fiction. Edited by Eric Carl Link and Gerry Canavan, Cambridge UP, 2015, pp. 70-82. Lothian, Alex. “Grinding Axess and Balancing Oppositions. The Transformation of Feminism in Ursula K. Le Guin’s Science Fiction.” Extrapolation, vol. 47, no. 3, 2006, pp. 380-395. Merrick, Helen. “Gender in Science Fiction.” The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction, Cambridge UP, 2003, pp. 241-252. Mishan, Ligaya. “First Contact. A Talk with Ursula K. Le Guin.” The New Yorker, 24 Jul. 2009. Pearson, Wendy Gay. “Postcolonialism/s, Gender/s, Sexuality/Ies and the Legacy of The Left Hand of Darkness. Gwyneth Jones’s Aleutians Talk Back.” The Yearbook of English Studies, vol. 37, no. 2, 2007, pp. 182–196. Rochelle, Warren G. G. “Ursula K. Le Guin.” A Companion to Science Fiction. Edited by David Seed, Wiley, 2007, pp. 408–419. Russ, Joanna. “Unhappy Housewife Heroines, Galactic Suburbia, and Nuclear War. A New History of Midcentury Women’s Science Fiction.” Extrapolation, vol. 44, no. 1, 2003, pp. 97-111 Russ, Joanna. “The Image of Women in Science Fiction.” The Country You Have Never Seen. Essays and Reviews, Liverpool UP, 2007, pp. 205–218.